Author

Rachel Turner

Date Approved

2017

Degree Type

Open Access Senior Honors Thesis

Department

World Languages

First Advisor

Zuzana Tomas

Abstract

With an increased number of immigrants and refugees entering the United States every year, many states and non-profit organizations offer English as a Second Language (ESL) programs. How do these organizations find materials that meet the needs of these learners and what type(s) of professional development do the organizations offer to their staff? The research presented is based on a survey of teachers and tutors who work with emergent adult readers. Discussed in what follows are principles to consider when selecting or creating effective materials in the classroom, rooted in the pedagogical framework of Tomlinson (2011), Vinogradov (2008), Beatty (2003) and Kukulska-Hulme (2009); a review of research examining the effectiveness of existing resources for adult English language learners, particularly at the beginning proficiency level, is shown. This research also examines the professional development for teachers and tutors of emergent adult readers and considers their views on materials development principles that pertain to reading and desired professional development opportunities. The research project concludes with implications for materials development and professional development experiences for the professionals working with adult emergent readers.

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