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Abstract

Every day, plants, animals, and ecosystems are subject to the dire consequences of anthropogenic environmental degradation. The damage caused by manufactured ecological destruction varies, and can be the result of ecological withdrawals (dangerous extraction of natural resources, such as fracking or deforestation), or ecological additions (dangerous introduction of environmental hazards into the environment, such as pollution). These practices result in millions of victims, and a small (but growing) group of criminologists has taken up the study of the victimization experiences associated with environmental crimes. Many of these criminologists identify as green criminologists, and in their works, argue that environmental crime victims, and research associated with environmental crime victim experience, remains on the periphery of mainstream criminology. This is a serious concern, as in order to (1) recognize the full scope and impact of environmental crime, (2) avoid victim blaming, and (3) generate a comprehensive victimology literature, criminologists must recognize environmental crime victims. This research explores the claims of green criminologists by exploring the representation of environmental crime victims in criminology’s victimology research. Sources are examined for key themes, as well as information on the victim experience of those who have endured environmental crimes. Results, implications, and suggestions for future study will be presented and discussed, in order to draw conclusions about the standing of environmental crime victims in criminology’s victimology research.

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