Date Approved

2-18-2009

Date Posted

12-15-2009

Degree Type

Open Access Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

College of Technology

Committee Member

Phillip Cardon, Ph.D., Dissertation Chair

Committee Member

Konnie Kustron, J. D.

Committee Member

Ronald Fulkert, Ph.D.

Committee Member

Louise Patrick, Ph.D.

Abstract

This quasi-experimental study employed a modified Technology Acceptance Model approach in conjunction with a Perceived Classroom Interaction Model. The study investigated the impact of digital audio recording of college classroom lectures on students' perceptions of interaction levels, usefulness, and use of the digital media.

The study surveyed six introductory computer science and technology classes. Previous computer knowledge was not assumed. The results found no significant differences of students' perceptions of interaction levels in traditional classroom lectures. However, gender was found to have a significant effect on speaking in class when a recorder was present. No significant differences were found when it came to perceived usefulness. Most students had used or intended to make use of the recorded lectures.

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