Date Approved

2008

Degree Type

Open Access Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Leadership and Counseling

Committee Member

Dr. Ronald Williamson, Chair

Committee Member

Dr. Ella Burton

Committee Member

Dr. Nelson Maylone

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine what relationship exists between the servant-leadership behavior of the elementary school principal, school climate, and student achievement. Data were collected through the use of two survey instruments. The (Revised) Servant-Leadership Profile: 360 (SLP-R: 360), developed by Page and Wong (2000), was used to assess principals’ perceptions of their servant-leadership behavior. To assess teachers’ perceptions of the health of the school climate, the Organizational Health Inventory for Elementary (OHI-RE), developed by Hoy, Tarter, and Kottkamp (1991), was used. The SLP-R: 360 was utilized as a self-perceived leadership style inventory, and the OHI-RE was used to assess teacher perception of school climate. Student achievement data, 4th grade MEAP test results, were gathered from the participating schools or through School Matters, a service of Standard and Poors.

The population of this study consisted of 206 randomly selected teachers from 27 elementary schools in Michigan. Data were analyzed through the use of Pearson Product Moment correlation analysis and linear regression analysis.

The results indicated a small or weak negative relationship between the servant-leadership behavior of elementary school principals and the health of the school climate, a small or weak negative relationship between the health of the school climate and student achievement, and a small or weak negative relationship between the independent variables of socioeconomic status, school population size, and community degree completion percentage and the dependent variable student achievement. Additionally, a small or weak negative relationship was identified between the independent variables of socioeconomic status, school population size, and community degree completion percentage and the health of the school climate. The results of the study indicate that there is no relationship between independent variables of servant-leadership behavior, school climate, socioeconomic status, school population size, and community degree completion percentage. There is also not enough statistical evidence to predict a relationship between the secondary independent variables (socioeconomic status and community degree completion percentage) and the health of the school climate. There is, however, statistical evidence to demonstrate a relationship between school population size and the health of the school. Conversely, when reporting correlations as significant at the 0.07 alpha level, the research concludes that there is a relationship between school population size, the health of the school climate, and student achievement.

Comments

Additional committee member: Dr. Gary Marx

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