Date Approved

2008

Degree Type

Open Access Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Health Sciences

Committee Member

Judith Brooks, PhD, RD

Committee Member

Anahita M. Mistry, PhD

Committee Member

Christina Miller, MS, RD

Abstract

Background: Obesity is an epidemic and studies are needed to provide recommendations for more effective strategies to increase self-efficacy and long-term adoption of healthy nutritional habits in individuals who are obese.

Objective: To compare the use of personalized low-fat meal plans vs. non-personalized low-fat meal plans and body fat reduction in overweight and obese subjects 25 to 45 years of age.

Design: A 2-month comparative randomized block experimental study, in which subjects were randomly assigned to either Treatment 1 Group, receiving non-personalized low-fat meal plans, or Treatment 2 Group, receiving personalized low-fat meal plans with two 30-minute dietetic consultations.

Subjects/Setting: Subjects were 17 men and women 25 to 45 years of age, classified as overweight or obese (BMI=25 to 50), and limited to minor chronic health conditions. A total of 87 individuals were interested, 73.02% (N=46) eligible, 36.96% (N=17) enrolled, 47.06% (N=8) received treatment, and 41.176% (N=7) completed the study.

Main Outcome Measures: Pre- and post-body fat measurements utilizing bioelectrical impedance analyzers (BIA).

Results: At the significance of P ≤ 0.05, the trend in the data appears to support the use of personalized low-fat meal planning with two 30-minute dietetic consultations ( x 10=8.4053 or 7.718#) as more effective in reducing body fat than use of non-personalized low-fat meal planning ( x 9=2.6825% or 2.049#) in females classified as Obese II (BMI=35 to 39.9). Furthermore, at the significance of P ≤ 0.05, the trend in the data seems to support the use of personalized low-fat meal planning with two 30-minute dietetic consultations ( x Tx2=8.3286% or 6.7299#) as more effective in reducing body fat than use of non-personalized low-fat meal planning ( x Tx1=3.7077% or 3.7838#) in females and males in the BMI classification categories of Overweight (BMI=25.0 to 29.9), Obese I (BMI=30.0 to 34.9), Obese II (BMI=35 to 39.9), and Obese III (BMI=>40).

Conclusion: This study and others in this area may lead to the development of more effective strategies in nutrition therapy to help reduce the prevalence of obesity in adults.

Included in

Nutrition Commons

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