Date Approved

2012

Degree Type

Open Access Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

College of Technology

Committee Member

Denise Pilato

Committee Member

Morell D. Boone

Committee Member

Polly Buchanan

Committee Member

Michael McVey

Abstract

Modern society is constantly evolving, affecting the creation and use of technology. Concurrently, technology is relentlessly developing and expanding, influencing the very society to which it is introduced. In a rapid-paced, globally influenced educational community, podcasts are among the latest and promising innovations being introduced into the educational arena to reach technology-savvy students. Information in various technological formats is not new, nor is their application to the educational process unique. Many past technologies such as the record player, tape player, radio, television, and computers were all believed to exhibit enormous potential to transform education. However, in almost every instance, they have failed to live up to the hype and promises made by their advocates. In some cases, they failed because something newer and better appeared; in other cases, it was the lack of resources and poor implementation or failing to understand the many challenges required to implement them. Although podcasting technology is not new, it is still in the formative stages as an educational resource. Recognizing the potential value of podcasts to the field of education, this study investigated factors that inhibit or influence the creation and use of podcasts as an educational resource. In addition, the study examined faculty’s satisfaction in the use of podcasts as a resource to achieve learning objectives and outcomes. Recognizing the potential value of podcasts to the field of education, this study investigated factors that inhibit or influence the creation and use of podcasts as an educational resource. In spite of the fact that most participants believed that podcasts would produce positive results, improve student engagement, and motivation, and that podcasts would improve their effectiveness as instructors, the majority of participants did not employ podcasts. In addition, most believed that there were inadequate incentives in exchange for the time and effort required to create and use podcasts.

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