Date Approved

2016

Degree Type

Open Access Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

College of Technology

Committee Member

Alphonso Bellamy

Committee Member

Ali Eydgahi

Committee Member

Virginia Harder

Committee Member

Herman Tang

Abstract

This study examines the impact of emotional intelligence, academic self-efficacy in science and technology, and family background on academic achievement of alternative high school students. Gender, age, learning style, and ethnicity of the student are analyzed to determine any moderator effect on these relationships. Seventy-five students, ages 14 to19, who attend a public alternative high school were surveyed. Analysis of the data revealed a positive relationship for males between self-efficacy in STEM classes and family background (support) and their academic achievement in science class. A positive relationship was shown between self-efficacy in STEM classes and academic achievement, between self-efficacy in STEM classes and academic achievement in science class for White/non-Hispanic and Native American students, and between family background and academic achievement in science class for White/non-Hispanic, Latino/Hispanic, and Native American students. There was a positive relationship between emotional intelligence and academic achievement in science class for Latino/Hispanic and African-American students. Kinesthetic, auditory, and visual learning styles demonstrated positive relationships as moderators on the independent variables. Students that were 17 and 19 years of age had moderating effects on the independent variables.

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