Author

Sushma Sanga

Date Approved

2016

Degree Type

Open Access Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

College of Technology

Committee Member

Ali Eydgahi

Committee Member

Al Belamy

Committee Member

Robert Chapman

Committee Member

Heui Lee

Abstract

Identity-theft means stealing someone’s personal information and using it without his or her permission. Each year, millions of Americans are becoming the victims of identitytheft, and this is one of the seriously growing and widespread issues in the U.S. This study examines the effect of electronic devices self-efficacy, electronic devices usage, and information security awareness on anxiety levels of southeastern Michigan students in becoming victims of identity-theft and whether there is any significant relationship between these variables. This research study used the effect of electronic devices self-efficacy, electronic devices usage and information security awareness on identity-theft anxiety level among southeastern students which form a research model. The research model identified electronic devices self-efficacy, electronic devices usage, and information security awareness as the main and direct factors that could affect identity-theft anxiety level in southeastern Michigan students. This study performed several analyses on a developed questionnaire to ensure validity and reliability. After examining all proposed hypotheses, this study found that electronic devices self-efficacy and usage does have significant impact on identity-theft anxiety level in southeastern students. The findings also support a relationship between information security awareness and identity-theft anxiety level in southeastern Michigan students. This research also showed that gender, employment status, race, age have moderating effects on all hypotheses. The outcome of this study provides more information regarding awareness of taking proactive measures about identity-theft and electronic devices usage among students.

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