Date Approved

2019

Degree Type

Open Access Senior Honors Thesis

Department

Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology

First Advisor

Megan Moore

Second Advisor

Julian Murchison

Abstract

This research explores injury patterns of casualties from combat due to Improvised Explosive Devices (IED), which can vary due to the unique circumstances related to an injury. This research hopes to understand how decisions on equipment production and safety mechanisms are employed. Some of the preliminary research includes a meta-analysis of various IED events, with a focus on conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. This research will also consider historical, current, and predictive analysis, to best understand the IED threat and to help save lives. Finally, this IED study is novel because it will approach this research from a holistic anthropological and biocultural perspective. 4

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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